Tag Archives: Black History Month

JFIC for Black History Month

Hello, jFIC fans,

It’s Black History Month, so let’s celebrate African American jFIC authors. Here’s a list of their awesome books :

The Crossover Series by Kwame Alexander

The Jumbies by Tracey Baptiste

Hurricane Child by Kacen Callender

Like Vanessa by Tami Charles

So Done by Paula Chase

Finding Langston by Lesa Cline-Ransome

New Kid (graphic novel) by Jerry Craft (Recent winner of the Newbery Medal, Coretta Scott King Author Award, and Kirkus Prize for Young Readers’ Literature)

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis

Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis

The Journey of Little Charlie by Christopher Paul Curtis

The Watsons Go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis

Blended by Sharon Draper

The Last Last-Day-of-Summer by Lamar Giles

Garvey’s Choice by Nikki Grimes

Bird by Angela Johnson

The Parker Inheritance by Varian Johnson

A Good Kind of Trouble by Lisa Moore Ramee

The Season of Stix Malone by Kekla Magoon

The Stars Beneath Our Feet by David Barclay Moore

How High the Moon by Karyn Parsons

Ghost and sequels by Jason Reynolds (current National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature)

Look Both Ways by Jason Reynolds

Bayou Magic by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Ghost Boys by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Sugar by Jewell Parker Rhodes

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor

Some Places More Than Others by Renee Watson

Genesis Begins Again by Alicia D. Williams

One Crazy Summer Trilogy by Rita Williams-Garcia

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson

My Life as an Ice Cream Sandwich by Ibi Zoboi


And also, because it’s Valentine’s Day, here’s a sweet love story: Dream Within a Dream by Patricia MacLachlan

Happy reading!

“I always get up and make a cup of coffee while it is still dark — it must be dark — and then I drink the coffee and watch the light come.” —Toni Morrison

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Filed under award-winning JFIC, JFIC Books, juvenile books, middle grade books

Black History Month / I Love to Read Month

Hello, Sweeteas,

February is Black History Month as well as I Love to Read Month. Awesome.

Here’s a fantastic website to help you find books by African American authors:

http://weneeddiversebooks.org/where-to-find-diverse-books/

And you’ll find the Coretta Scott King award winners here:

http://www.ala.org/emiert/cskbookawards

The list of award winners includes March: Book Three by Congressman John Lewis and Andrew Aydin and illustrated by Nate Powell:

March: Book Three is the final installment of the March Trilogy, a black and white graphic novel about the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, told from the point of view of Congressman John Lewis. It has won several awards including the Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, the Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in young-adult literature, the Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award, and the YALSA Award for excellence in young-adult nonfiction.

Also, here’s the list of Newbery Award winners:

http://www.ala.org/alsc/awardsgrants/bookmedia/newberymedal/newberymedal

And last, but not least, three book recommendations from different genres:

1- Historical Fiction: Elijah of Buxton by Christopher Paul Curtis:

Of all of Christopher Paul Lewis’s books, Elijah of Buxton is my favorite. It made me laugh and it made me cry. This is the story of eleven-year-old Elijah Freeman, the first free child born in Buxton, Canada, a settlement of runaway African American slaves just over the border from Detroit. The book won a 2008 Newbery Honor Award, the 2008 Coretta Scott King Award, the 2008 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction, and the 2008 Canadian Library Association Book of the Year for Children Award.

2- Poetry: Poetry for Young People: Langston Hughes edited by David Roessel and Arnold Rampersad and illustrated by Benny Andrews:

Langston Hughes (1902-1967) was an American writer considered to be a primary contributor of the Harlem Reinassance. This is an illustrated collection of some of his best-known poems. It won the 2007 Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honor Award.

3- Folktales: The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales told by Virginia Hamilton:

The People Could Fly is a beautiful illustrated collection of folktale retellings. It won the 1986 Coretta Scott King Award.

Happy reading!

Why hasn’t someone invented an alarm clock that just hands you a cup of coffee? –Anonymous

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Filed under middle grade and YA books